WINTER – Winter Mondays

All Winter Monday classes are FREE.  Space is limited.
NCC Photo ID with current LLI sticker is required for entry to classes. 

All Monday classes: 1:10–2:50 pm, in Room W105

 

January 8 – Why Is Connecticut Floundering?  

Once upon a time Connecticut was an attractive state, lovely, with hilly, green hamlets nestled between Boston and New York. Today the state is characterized by slow growth, yawning inequality, inadequate job creation, failing casinos, a sprawling government, stagnant incomes and a high cost of living. The corridor between Bridgeport and Greenwich is the most congested in the nation. Over 75% of Connecticut’s roads are in mediocre condition, and 25% of its bridges are structurally deficient. Places Rated Almanac rated Waterbury as “the worst place to live in America.” People and corporations, like Aetna and General Electric, are leaving the state. Finances are a mess, the capital city of Hartford is facing bankruptcy, and the state is saddled with a $3.5 billion deficit.  With one legislator, two big-city Mayors and a Governor currently serving or having served time in jail, our state is oftentimes referred to as “Corrupt-icut.”  The class discusses how the state got into this jam and how it might get out.              
                 
Ralph Loomis earned degrees from University of Connecticut, Trinity and Wesleyan. He served as an intern to Connecticut Governor John Dempsey, Director of Government for Novartis and as Chief of Staff to Congressman Christopher Shays. Ralph has taught classes at LLI and also serves as President of  Lifetime Learners. 

 

January 15 – Closed, Martin Luther King Day 

 

January 22 – King Sejong the Great: The Everlasting Light of Korea and Modern Korea 
Korea, once known as the Land of the Morning Calm, is one of the twelve largest economies in the world, and is predicted to be the eighth largest by 2030.  The non-profit organization, The Korean Spirit and Culture Project (KSCPP), was formed to promote Korean history and culture to the world. KSCPP introduces Korea’s long and rich artistic history, the spirit of its people, and its cultural values. In appreciation for American support for Korea during the Korean War, and in the years that followed, KSCPP has held 1,800 complimentary presentations throughout the country. This event includes two short documentary films: One focuses on King Sejong the Great, a truly enlightened monarch who ruled Korea during the 15th century, whose motto was, “The duty of a king is to love his people. That is all.”  The second film illustrates the modern-day achievements of Korea. Following the program, traditional Korean desserts will be served.
Kyung won Pak is the Director of the Korean Spirit & Culture Promotion Project in Flushing

 

 

January 29 – DNA Testing: Getting Into Your Hand-Me-Down Genes

Have you ever wondered about the Ancestry DNA and the 23andMe television commercials? Maybe you’ve thought about testing, or even ordered a DNA kit, or you’re one of the millions who are already in a DNA database. This class is for those with questions about finding their ancestors’ locations dating back hundreds, and even thousands of years ago, or with questions about how the tests help to find long-lost relatives and in building family trees. Over a dozen close relatives of the instructor, including adoptees and an adoptee’s child who wanted to know where they came from and hoped to get some critical family health history, have given permission to share the results of their DNA tests and other information.                                                                                                                                                                          
Janeen Bjork
is a television researcher who has applied the detective, analytic and presentation skills she garnered over a thirty year career to explore her family tree, and the trees of friends, students and clients. She enjoys introducing others to the research methods and strategies that make it possible to find and preserve legacies for posterity. Since 2011 she has spent thousands of hours researching, documenting and preserving her family history.