Courses

Facilitator: Gary Lishnoff

The 60’s produced some of the greatest American music of all time. Even today rock and roll is listened to not only by the 60’s generation but also by their children and grandchildren. American music of the 60’s had great rock, love songs, protest songs, surf music, R&B, country classics, the New York sound, the California sound and, of course, Motown.  With the help of videos and DVD’s we visit your favorites:  the Shirelles, the Drifters, the Miracles, Ray Charles, the Beach Boys, Bob Dylan, the Ronettes, Simon & Garfunkel, Aretha Franklin, Crosby Stills & Nash, the Supremes, the Temptations and James Taylor, just to name a few.  Sing and hum along and join the fun!

Facilitator: Mark Albertson

We take up where American Empire Part I leaves off — from the grandest hoax ever perpetrated on modern man, the Versailles Treaty, to the modern American Corporate State. Focus is on such developments as the McCormick Dickstein Committee and the Business Plot; the Military-Industrial Complex; the 1947 National Security Act; George Kennan and Containment; monolithic finance capital; the Lewis Powell Memo; Manifesto of American Fascism; demise of the Soviet Union and the unilateral world of a single superpower; Democrats and Republicans as denominations of a single major party in America, the Corporate State; the marginalization of the Constitution and America as a failed state politically; the militarization of American foreign policy; the erosion of the middle class; the myth of American beneficence…these and other factors are explored and discussed for a better understanding of the American Empire. (more…)

Facilitator: Gary Lishnoff

Join us to explore the history of the Jews in America. We focus on individual personalities and stories of the 350-year saga about immigrants who gradually wove themselves into the fabric of America, yet maintained the traditions that set them apart.  With the help of handouts, discussions and award-winning documentaries, we move from the early days to eventual success in various fields in becoming Americanized. Business leaders, corporate giants and living legends – Irving Berlin, Gertrude Berg, Warner Bros. and Louis B Mayer, the great Jewish comedians of the Catskills, TV and movies and, yes, Supreme Court Justices and Vice-Presidential candidates.  You don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy the journey.

8 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 1:10 PM

Facilitator: Erik Rambusch

This is a discussion course. Participants help select the topics to be explored with the instructor identifying the underlying policy issues while adding historical and theoretical perspectives. Class involvement, exchanging of informed opinions as well as the norms of civil conversation are encouraged.  Issues might include: Immigration/Refugee Policy, National Budget, National Tax Proposals, how to employ the unemployed, National Energy Policy, International Trade, Current Constitutional Issues, Transportation Infrastructure and Health Care Policies.

 

Syllabus: Analysis of Weekly Policy Issues

Erik Rambusch, Rambusch@optonline.net

 The following lists the type of policy issues to be discussed.  The order in which they will be analyzed will be a function of how they emerge in the national debate.

  1. Immigrant/Refugee/Migrant Policy:  Define different classifications.  Should limits/criteria be set for each group? How should they be enforced?
  2. Nation Budget: Is the debt of the USA out of proportion to the GNP (Gross National Product)? Is the federal government is too big/inefficient/collecting too much money that could be better spent elsewhere? How should we reprioritize federal spending?
  3. National Tax Proposals: Can the present Individual/Corporate Income tax system be fixed –if so how? Should we establish a flat tax or value added system?
  4. How to Reduce Unemployment: Will training and more education help the less than fully employed reach their potential, and give the USA the better trained work force we need? What change of strategy would work more effectively?
  5. National Energy Strategy: Should we ban all future oil imports and/or coal burning electric generation plants? Should we require that all air conditioning should run on solar power generated by the user?
  6. International Trade: In the long run are unilateral trade agreements more effective then multilateral ones? What should we change/not change with NAFTA (North American Trade Agreement)?  Should we resurrect the TPP (Trans Pacific Partnership)?
  7. Current Constitutional Issues: Example: Was the April bombing of a Syria Airbase constitutional?
  8. What should our future transportation Infrastructures look like vis a vis air, auto, trains and water? How should we finance this upgrade?
  9. Why is our tradition heath care policy at variance with most industrial world? How can we reduce cost without reducing quality? 

Facilitator: John O’Hern

Your stories are your legacy!!! How do you tell a personal story — one that becomes a transitional moment for you?  How do you cultivate the skills for public speaking?  How do you peel back the details until you discover the inner journey that a good story requires? A master storyteller teaches the art of the story while offering techniques that make it compelling. In class, you learn how to extract the true core of your narratives and how to tell them in an entertaining fashion. Join us to present your stories for practice, critique and mostly … for fun.

8 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 1:10 PM  

 

Syllabus: The Art of Storytelling  
John O’Hern, john@johnohern.com

Week 1: As brief lecture on the simplest requirements of a well told story

Weeks 2-8  Your stories and critique 

Facilitator: Anne Peskin 

Looking at the sky what do you see—stars? In this course we learn about the composition of stars, their constellations and the myths that ancient civilizations and the Greeks composed around them.  We  begin at the North Pole, follow the seasons and end at the South Pole.

Syllabus: Astronomy: Seeing Stars
Anne Peskin

Week 1:              History of Astronomy

Week 2:              The Northern Sky

Week 3:              The Fall Sky

Week 4:              The Winter Sky

Week 5:              The Spring and Summer Sky

Week 6:              The Southern Sky

Facilitator: Dr. Roger Levy

Environmental issues were of little concern to Mao Zedong, and, during the subsequent period of double-digit economic growth, damage to the environment kept on getting worse. Has the situation reached a tipping point with citizens clamoring for improvements and the government lending a receptive ear to the demands?  China is already Number One in the solar industry. Which other technologies are being deployed to make the country greener and can they compensate for the increased pollution associated with a richer society?

 

Syllabus:   China’s Economic Development: Environmental Impacts

Dr. Roger Levy

Note: subject to change

Week 1: Urbanization, deforestation, shrinking biodiversity

Week 2: Energy: fossil fuels, renewable sources.

Week 3: Water: shortages, pollution, desertification

Week 4: Air pollution and related health consequences, global warming.

Week 5: China’s search for resources across the world.

Week 6: Sustainability, toward a greener future?

Facilitator: Ellen Gordon

Ever want to create artwork from images, decorative papers and art materials? Join a professional media artist to show you how to combine materials to create fascinating artwork. Drawing and painting is integrated with collage.  No experience necessary – just a willingness to try! Demonstrations and individual attention is given as each student works to complete mixed media creations.  Elements of design and composition theories are taught to enhance each student’s way of thinking about and creating art. Each week  will include short education lecture/demonstration on design principles as well as hands on individual art creation. Famous artists are discussed and studied. Books and related materials about notable artists are available for class discussion. Photographs of other artwork can be used and transferring techniques are explained. We end each session with a brief critique.

Materials to bring: archival glue stick, mat medium or other archival craft glue of choice, decorative collage papers of student’s choice (newspaper, magazines, colored paper, wrapping paper — anything can be used), tracing paper, scissors, pencil, any kind of paint and heavy weight paper or canvas of your choice. 

 

Facilitator: Dick Rauh

This is a drawing class where we collect leaves, learn some science and then draw accurate line drawings in pencil that we then color with colored pencils.

Materials:  pencils (2H to 2B), smooth paper sketchpad (9”x12” or 11”x14”), (Prismacolor box of 12) or any decent colored pencil box), kneaded eraser and a loupe.  The instructor brings a wide range of colored pencils in addition for you to try out.

Facilitator: Lewis Clark

The course takes the class from the flush of the toilet to the discharge into Long Island Sound.  A description of the purification process is described and history and future of wastewater treatment is discussed. The treatment facility must be capable of processing anything that comes down the pipe while discharging a consistent effluent within strict environmental standards. A tour of Norwalk’s wastewater treatment plant is included. 

Syllabus: Cool Clear Water: Wastewater Treatment
Lewis Clark

Week 1: Nomenclature and definitions
Potable water treatment
Septic tank design
From House to Treatment Plant

Week 2: First stages of treatment: bar screen and degritting
Primary treatment: particle settling
Thickening
Scum, the nasty by-product

Week 3: Secondary treatment
Theory and History

Week 4: Sludge, the residual leftover
Uses for sludge
Incineration
Energy recapture

Week 5: Plant tour
Depart NCC West campus, main entrance
OR Meet at 60 South Smith Street
Return to NCC two hours later

Week 6: Feedback from plant trip
Plant operating data
Tertiary treatment
Nitrogen credits
The future of wastewater treatment

Facilitator: Dr. Elissa Kaplan

Join us for a virtual cruise through the ancient world to explore the oldest cities on every continent.  Along the way, we investigate what makes a place a community; examine how ordinary people lived and how they shaped history.

 

6 sessions starting Friday, Oct. 6 at 10:10 AM 

Syllabus: Cruise of the Centuries:  Ancient Cities
Dr. Elissa Kaplan,
 elissa@de-kaplan.com

Week 1: Asia 
Angkor Wat, Cambodia, Bagan, Myanmar, Kyoto, Japan, Beijing, China, Xi’an, China,
Borobudur, Indonesia

Week 2: Americas: 
Tikal, Guatemala, Poverty Point, Louisiana, Machu Picchu, Peru, Cholula, Mexico

Week 3: Europe 
Rome, Italy, Athens, Greece, Stonehenge, England, Plovdiv, Bulgaria, Lisbon, Portugal

Week 4: Middle East 
Istanbul, Turkey, Jerusalem Israel, Petra, Jordan, Damascus, Persopolis, Iran, Nimrud, Iraq 

Week 5:  Indian Subcontinent
Ellora, India, Madurai, India, Takht-i-Bahi, Pakistan, Varanasi, India

Week 6:  Africa 
Great Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe, Timbuktu, Mali, Cairo, Egypt, Gondar, Ethiopia

Note:  There might be some changes in the order of cities presented.  We may not get to cruise into all the cities, but no turning back!

Facilitator: Art Gottlieb

 Current Events

Framed by the week’s trending news, this course relies on rigorous, yet respectful, debate to enhance our understanding of divergent viewpoints in the reporting of current events.  Discussions address politics, sex, religion and their place in contemporary culture – issues that give life depth and meaning.  We focus on developing critical reasoning skills by examining the pre-conceived biases that affect our personal objectivity.

Art Gottlieb is a local historian on subjects of political and military history. He was formerly a Curator of Naval History and Technical Director of Exhibits at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in NYC, where he worked extensively to create displays which accurately illustrate the history of 20th century warfare.

Participants may choose only one Current Events day 
8 sessions starting Thursday, Sept. 14 at 3:10 PM

Facilitator: Art Gottlieb

 Framed by the week’s trending news, this course relies on rigorous, yet respectful, debate to enhance our understanding of divergent viewpoints in the reporting of current events.  Discussions address politics, sex, religion and their place in contemporary culture – issues that give life depth and meaning.  We focus on developing critical reasoning skills by examining the pre-conceived biases that affect our personal objectivity.

Art Gottlieb is a local historian on subjects of political and military history. He was formerly a Curator of Naval History and Technical Director of Exhibits at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in NYC, where he worked extensively to create displays which accurately illustrate the history of 20th century warfare.

Participants may choose only one Current Events  day 
Section 1: 8 sessions starting Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 3:10 PM

 

Facilitator: Jim Kahnweiler

Today’s  cameras have made photography easy.  But the fundamentals have not changed since the days of film. The instructor answers questions about photography and explains how to gain control of your digital camera, demonstrates techniques to improve composition and gives an introduction to post-capture processing. Using discussions, assignments, a field trip and critiques, participants learn how to make better images. 

Participants should bring a digital camera and have a basic understanding how it operates. Any camera is acceptable; most digital cameras and lenses manufactured in the last 5 years can produce excellent pictures. Also, everyone should have access to an internet-enabled computer and the ability to connect to a photo sharing website. This is how images will be displayed during discussions, using Google Photos. More information will be provided with your registration.

Before the first class, participants will upload ONE favorite photograph, which will be used in the discussion on composition during the first class. It can be any photo; made by the participant or by someone else. Be ready to say why the image is important.

Syllabus

 

 

Facilitator: Ralph Loomis

We examine Trump’s youth and his early career in real estate before he went straight into business with his father, where his values and business practices were shaped.  For three decades Trump built, renovated, and managed numerous office towers, hotels, casinos and golf courses. He licensed the use of his name and hosted The Apprentice, a reality TV show. His net worth is estimated to be $3.5 billion, making him the only billionaire to be elected to the Presidency. How Trump amassed his fortune is discussed.  In June 2015, Trump launched his campaign for President and quickly emerged as the front-runner in Republican primaries. In July he was formally nominated President at the GOP National Convention. He won the general election in a surprise victory against Hillary Clinton and became the oldest and wealthiest person to assume the presidency, the first without prior military or government service and the fifth to have won the election while losing the popular vote. How Trump won the GOP nomination and election is examined in the last two weeks of the class.

 

Syllabus: Donald Trump Revealed
Ralph Loomis

Trump’s youth and early career in real estate 
Education at military academy and Wharton School
”Whatever he touched turned to gold”
Values and business practices established

Three decades Real Estate 
Building renovating and managing office towers, hotels, casinos and golf courses Licensed use of his name for branding 
Produced and hosted TV series The Apprentice

First interest in running for political office, 1987 
Won Reform party presidential primaries in 2000, but withdrew candidacy 
2015 Start of Presidential campaign 
2016 Won Republican primary

2016 General Election 
Surprize victory vs. Hillary Clinton 
2017 Inaugurated as President 
Oldest, wealthiest and first without prior military/government service 
5th to win election while losing popular vote 
Political positions described as populist, protectionist and nationalist

Facilitator: Gary Carlson,

This course traces the evolution of the most American of musical forms from its beginning in African and European traditions to its melding of blues, country, gospel, folk and pop into something unique and revolutionary.  We examine the parallels between the Jazz Age of the 20’s, the Big Band era of the 30’s and 40’s and the burgeoning popularity of Rhythm & Blues and “Hillbilly” music in the post-World War II era.  We study such influential figures as Louis Armstrong, Bing Crosby, Louis Jordan, Ruth Brown and Sister Rosetta Thorpe as well as important vocal groups such as The Mills Brothers, The Ink Spots, The Dominoes and The Drifters. Finally, we look at early recordings of icons like Bill Haley, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Chuck Berry, LaVern Baker and Wanda Jackson plus producers and DJ’s like Sam Phillips, Ahmet Ertegun, the Chess Brothers, Dewey Phillips and Alan Freed.  We discuss Rock ‘n Roll’s impact on American Society and culture from the breakdown of racial and sexual barriers to the formation of a new, teenage social class with its various subcultures.

 

Syllabus:

Early Roots of Rock & Roll (Part I)

Gary Carlson, gcarlson@ncc.commnet.edu

My mission in this course is to focus on the formative years or rock’n’roll and to shine a spotlight on those artists, innovators, and events that played an important part in this story but that, unfortunately, today are largely forgotten (or misunderstood).

Note: In lieu of a textbook, many handouts and supplemental articles will be provided by the Professor each week.

Week 1:          Student/professor intros. Informal discussion about student expectations/

                                    concerns. Prof talks about the importance of telling the true

                                    history of rock’n’roll and not just focusing on the familiar names

                                    and greatest hits, as well as the challenge of balancing the demands

                                    of time, historical accuracy, a wealth of material, and student

                                    participation.

                        Professor distributes/discusses “Time Line” and “Billboard” handouts.

                        Class discussion: What is Rock’n’Roll? Where did it come from? Why

                                    does it matter? Test class’s “Rock’n’Roll IQ” (esp regarding the

                                    various sub-genres and “roots” artists that we will be studying). J

                        Presentation on early American music—vaudeville, minstrels, Broadway,

                                    early jazz (esp Louis Armstrong, Fats Waller—CD1+).

 

Week 2:          Prof distributes/discusses Bing/Elvis and Les Paul handouts.

Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

Presentation on music of the “Roaring ‘20’s” (Spotlight on vaudeville/

            minstrel shows, Al Jolson, Louis Armstrong, and Bing Crosby—

            CD1&2).

 

Week 3:          Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

                                    Continue presentation on music of the 1920’s-30’s (Spotlight on

Les Paul, the colossus who spanned and helped to shape the history

of modern American music—from country and blues to jazz and

pop, even rock’n’roll. He influenced and inspired virtually

everybody!).

Prof distributes/discusses handouts on Robert Johnson, Jimmie

Rogers, and Woody Guthrie.

 

Week 4:          Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

Continue presentation on roots music of the 1930’s Depression Era

            (Spotlight on early country, blues, folk, and gospel artists such as

            Jimmie Rogers, Robert Johnson, Huddie Ledbetter (Leadbelly),

            Woody Guthrie, and The Golden Gate Quartet (bring separate

            CD’s—as well as some very

early rock’n’roll from the ‘30’s—CD1).

Prof dist/discusses handout(s) on Boogie Woogie music and Amos

Milburn.

 

Week 5:          Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

Presentation on WWII years and the emergence of boogie woogie, rhythm

            & blues, hillbilly, and acappella/gospel-influenced group

            harmonies on the pop scene. Play rock’n’roll songs from the early

            ‘40’s. (Spotlight on “Der Bingle,” The Andrews Sisters, Johnny

            Mercer, the Mills Brothers, The Ink Spots, and Amos Milburn).

Discuss social changes—particularly regarding youth, race, class, and

            women.

                        Prof dist/discusses handout(s) on Louis Jordan.

 

Week 6:          Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

Presentation on 1945 & ‘46 (Spotlight on Louis Jordan, the King of

            1940’s and early 50’s R&B, as big as Elvis in the black

            community, an artist who influenced everyone from Chuck Berry

            to Bill Haley to James Brown). Feature appropriate CD’s.

                        Prof dist/discusses handouts on Louis Prima and Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

 

Week 7:          Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

Continue presentation on 1945 & ‘46 (Spotlight on Louis Prima—the

            “black” paisan, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe—the gospel superstar

            who went secular and inspired Elvis!).

Prof distributes/discusses handout on Cover Records.

 

Week 8:          Class discussion of handouts distributed last class.

Presentation on 1947 & ‘48 (Spotlight on Cover Records vs. Crossover

            Records, and artists such as Arthur Crudup, Bill Monroe, Eddy

            Arnold, Dinah Washington, and Nat “King” Cole). Feature

            appropriate CD’s.

 Note: Part II of this course will pick up where we left off! I hope you’ll be back for more in the Spring! JGC

Facilitator: Art Gottlieb

Long before the emergence of today’s digital age photography, a generation of talented artists emerged who are remembered for creating the most iconic and enduring photographs of all time. Their life’s works chronicled the events of the 20th century, the rise of automation, Western landscapes, the Great Depression, the New Deal programs of the 1930’s, the home front as well as overseas operations during World War II and beyond.     

8 sessions starting Saturday, Sept. 16 at 1:10 PM 

Syllabus: Eight Iconic Photographers
Art Gottlieb

  • Edward Steichen
  • Margaret Bourke-White
  • Alfred Eisenstaedt
  • Edward Weston
  • Lewis Hine
  • Weegee
  • Dorothea Lange
  • Ansel Adams 

 

Photo Credit: Edward Weston, By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27863857

Facilitator: June Euston Bird

Essentrics is a dynamic, one-hour, low impact weight-free fitness program that strengthens the muscles in the elongated position, quickly creating a long, lean and rebalanced body. The unique fluid movement of Essentrics slenderizes and tones the abs, waist, thighs, arms and back, while improving posture, flexibility, agility and strength. Essentrics rapidly and safely conditions the full-body so that it can be done daily, helping you feel energized, positive, healthy and strong.
This is a one hour class, from 3:10pm to 4:10pm
(despite what other resources may say)

A pre-participation medical screening form will be sent to all enrolled members and must be returned to the LLI office at least one week in advance of the start date.

Please note: persons with a disease or condition that might result in health issues when engaging in low-level movement activity should not enroll in the course.

Facilitator: Ken Lyon

The universe started with the Big Bang.  But how did it start from nothing?  As armchair scientists, we’ll explore the wonder and mystery of the beginning and how the universe evolved from subatomic particles to atoms of hydrogen, to stars and galaxies and to planets with life forms.  Come and find out how you are related to stardust and what a brief moment in time humans have been on planet Earth. 

Approximately half the classes focuses on the evolution of the cosmos and its components; the other half addresses how evolution has taken life on earth from simple bacteria and algae to dinosaurs and squirrel sized mammals to whales, elephants and finally to humans, sequoias and seed plants.  Special attention is given to human evolution. 

Syllabus:  Evolution of the Universe:  From Nothing to Everything 
Ken Lyon, klyonshart@aol.com

This is an approximate timeline as class questions are encouraged and other timely topics may be introduced.

Week1:   Current Events and the Beginning of the Universe

Week 2:  Stars and Galaxies and Our Place in the Universe

Week 3:  Nebulae, Black Holes, Dark Matter and Dark Energy

Week 4:  Our Solar System and the Formation of the Earth

Week 5:  Beginning of Life on Earth

Week 6:  Animals Without Backbones and Simple Plants

Week 7:  More Advanced Life Forms: Fish to Dinosaurs, Spores to Seeds

Week 8:  More Advanced Life Forms: Birds to Mammals to Humans

Facilitator: Dr. Joshua Berrett

It has been said that one doesn’t see a movie as much as feel a movie. We continue to explore how and why this happens as we analyze a diverse range of movie composers such as Philip Glass, Dimitri Tiomkin, Elmer Bernstein, Michel LeGrand, Nino Rota, James Horner and Hans Zimmer and the directors with whom they worked. Among the movies to be explored are: Fatal Attraction, Koyaanisqatsi, The Third Man, La Dolce Vita, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, Moonstruck, Ben Hur, The Ten Commandments, High Noon, Spellbound, Titanic and Inception.

 

Syllabus: EXPLORING THE MOVIE SOUNDTRACK, ACT II.
JOSHUA BERRETT, 
jberrett@verizon.net

 

Week 1: On feeling a movie;  Wagnerian antecedents   

Week 2: Opera goes to the movies  

Week 3: Revisiting Philip Glass and KOYAANISQATSI   

Week 4: Dimitri Tiomkin and the American Western

Week 5: The theremin, psychoanalysis, and the extra-terrestrial

Week 6: Elmer Bernstein and THE TEN COMMANDMENTS;  Orson Welles and  the Cold War  

Week 7: Michel LeGrand and Nino Rota

Week 8: Two faces of Leonardo DiCaprio: James Horner and TITANIC; Hans Zimmer and INCEPTION

Facilitator: Janeen Bjork

Genealogy & Computers I: Beginners

This course is for genealogy novices who need instruction on using computer software and the Internet. We cover the fundamentals of genealogy, including lessons in documentary evidence, family history research methodology and the Genealogical Proof Standard. Students are introduced to the types of documents and the sources used most frequently by genealogists: census records; birth, marriage and death records; immigration records; naturalization and military records; city directories and newspapers. There is also instruction on computer basics, including internet browsers, search engines and security; Hot keys; Windows; uploading and downloading; external devices; and saving and organizing one’s work. While taking the course, students are encouraged to go to their local public library and take advantage of the services provided by the research librarians.

 

Syllabus: Genealogy & Computers 1: Beginners
Janeen Bjork,
b_janeen@hotmail.com

Week 1: Introductions; Goals for the course; Introduction to Genealogy

Week 2: Documentary evidence; what’s in a name; The U.S. Census

Week 3: The U.S. Census continued; State censuses; Foreign country censuses

Week 4: Vital records; Birth, Marriage and Death

Week 5: Religious records; Cemetery records; FindAGrave.com

Week 6: Immigration and Naturalization records

Week 7: Military records

Week 8: Online newspaper resources

Facilitator: Janeen Bjork

Genealogy & Computers II: Advanced Beginners

This course is for those who have significant experience with computer software and the internet but who are new to genealogy. Students learn the fundamentals of genealogy, including lessons in documentary evidence, family history research methodology and the Genealogical Proof Standard. They are also introduced to the types of documents and the sources used by genealogists: census records, birth, marriage and death records; immigration and naturalization records, military records; city directories and newspapers. Homework is optional but recommended.

 

Genealogy & Computers II:  Advanced Beginners
Janeen Bjork,
b_janeen@hotmail.com

Week 1: Introductions; Goals for the course; Introduction to Genealogy

Week 2: Documentary evidence; what’s in a name; The U.S. Census

Week 3: The U.S. Census continued; State censuses; Foreign country censuses

Week 4: Vital records; Birth, Marriage and Death

Week 5: Religious records; Cemetery records; FindAGrave.com

Week 6: Immigration and Naturalization records

Week 7: Military records

Week 8: Online newspaper resources

 

Facilitator: Janeen Bjork

Genealogy & Computers III:  Intermediate and Advanced

This course is for those who have at least six months experience using the internet for genealogy. Students work individually and in teams solving genealogy problems, employing a variety of genealogy websites and strategies.  Instruction is tailored to address individual and group issues. Homework is optional but recommended.

 

Syllabus: Genealogy & Computers III: Intermediate & Advanced
Janeen Bjork,
b_janeen@hotmail.com

Week 1: Introductions, Goals for the course

Week 2: Documentary evidence; citing sources; students will each bring at least one brick wall research problem/issue to class that will be discussed and worked on collaboratively

Week 3: Facilitator offers instruction in resources, online and off, that students may not know exist, that will help solve problems identified in week two

Week 4: Students will divide into teams to work on each other’s brick wall issues together

Week 5: Continuation of week four

Week 6: Each team will present to the class, beginning with the brick wall issues, through the methodology and the resources employed and the success, or lack thereof, in break through

Week 7: Documentary evidence; citing sources; writing for publication

Week 8: Technology issues and design elements for publishing Genealogy blogs, articles and books

 

Facilitator: Joe Utterback

Dr. Joe continues his 1950’s survey of the Great American Songbook with one of the greatest songs from that era, The Man That Got Away, music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Ira Gershwin. He discusses the wonderful film A Star is Born, about which he knows many good stories! Two important hit shows Pajama Game and Damn Yankees by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross are reviewed.  The timeless classics, Misty and Something’s Gotta Give brings us into 1956 with The Bells are Ringing, Most Happy Fella and My Fair Lady.  Dr. Joe tells us many behind-the-scenes stories as he creatively plays the music on a piano keyboard in a classroom setting.

Facilitator: Erik Rambusch

Great Decisions is America’s largest discussion program on world affairs.  Published annually by the Foreign Policy Association, the Great Decisions briefing book highlights eight of the most thought-provoking foreign policy challenges facing America today.  The briefing book provides background information, current data and policy options for each issue and serves as the focal text for discussion groups. The issues discussed are:

  • The future of Europe: coping with crisis
  • Trade, jobs and politics
  • Conflict in the South China Sea
  • Saudi Arabia in transition
  • US foreign policy and petroleum
  • Latin America’s political pendulum
  • Prospects for Afghanistan and Pakistan
  • Nuclear Security: enduring the challenge of nuclear weapons

 

We discuss one topic per session. Copies of these books are available in the LLI office before classes begin. It is important that all participants read the appropriate section of the briefing book (approximately 8 to 10 pages) to prepare for these discussions.

 

8 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 3:10 PM

Facilitator: Morgan Corrigan,

 I Love to Read

Always New!  Join six LLI members as they lead interesting and lively discussions of contemporary titles and treasured classics.
Please note: Harriet Malbin will substitute for Instructor Morgan Corrigan.
The schedule has been revised–please see below for the current schedule.

September 11 – Nutshell by Ian McEwan:  Michael Mugnolo, presenter

In the four hundred years since the death of William Shakespeare an untold number of writers, talented or otherwise, have attempted to improve upon the Bard’s masterpieces by changing the settings of characters. None, however, have been as bizarre as Ian McEwan’s casting a fetus (in utero) as Hamlet, as he attempts to thwart the plot between his mother and his uncle to kill his father. Nutshell introduces us to a fetus who opines on James Joyce, French wines and the erosion of Enlightenment values, as well as ways to forestall his mother’s nefarious conspiracy.

Please note:
The Children of Willesden Lane has been re-scheduled for October 23.

September 25 – Benediction by Kent Haruf: Dick Auwarter, presenter

When Dad Lewis is diagnosed with terminal cancer, he and his wife must work together to make his final days as comfortable as possible. Bracing, sad and deeply illuminating, Benediction captures the fullness of life by representing every stage of it, including its extinction, as well as the hopes and dreams that sustain us along the way. From the beloved and best-selling author of Plainsong and Eventide comes a story of life and death and the ties that bind, once again set in the High Plains in Holt, Colorado.

October 2 – The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Mark Albertson, presenter

Sherlock Holmes, Doyle’s ace sleuth, and his confidant, Doctor Watson, must solve a mystery based on the legend of a massive hound that has plagued the Baskerville family for centuries. The majesty of Baskerville Hall in the wild open country of Dartmoor sets the stage for Sherlock Holmes to separate fact from legend in one of Doyle’s greatest efforts. As with The Maltese Falcon, references to movies of the title are included, especially the version featuring Basil Rathbone.

October 9 – The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood: Angela Vicenzi, presenter

Published in 1985, this is a dystopian novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood. Set in a near-future New England, where a totalitarian theocracy has overthrown the United States government, the novel explores themes of women in subjugation and the various means by which they gain individualism and independence. The Handmaid’s Tale won the 1985 Governor General’s Award and the first Arthur Clarke Award two years later, in 1987.

October 16 – The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy: Miwako Ogasawa, presenter

Leo Tolstoy’s short novel The Death of Ivan Ilyich, first published in 1886, is considered one of his masterpieces. The story of a high court judge and his sufferings and death in 19th century Russia, we see him, the protagonist, as a man who has enjoyed such steady success in life that he never gives more than a passing thought to the inevitability of death, until DEATH announces itself to him. This novella, written shortly after his religious conversion in the late 1870s, is regarded as an artistic culmination of his personal struggles. 

October 23 –  The Children of Willesden Lane by Mona Golabek and Lee Cohen: Heather Hopkins, presenter. (Re-scheduled from Sept. 18)

In 1938, Lisa Jura was a fourteen-year-old musical prodigy with hopes of becoming a concert pianist. However, when Nazi Germany took over Vienna, her parents made the difficult, desperate decision to send her to England on the Kindertransport. As she boarded the train, Lisa’s mother’s last words were, “Hold on to your music.” Mona Golabek’s story of Lisa’s life and music is a tribute to her mother—and a tribute to all displaced children and to those who gave them refuge.

Facilitator: Michael Mugnolo

What exactly do we mean by inequality?  Is it good or bad?  Hardly a day goes by that we do not read or hear about inequality.  How is it measured? What are its effects? Are they benign or malignant? What level of inequality should a society attempt to achieve? Is perfect equality a reasonable goal? What macroeconomic policies can a society implement to manage inequality?  What forces behind inequality are beyond the reach of political or economic policy? Join us in this course as we attempt to address all these questions with a particular emphasis on the last two.

 

Syllabus: i < p > e
Michael Mugnolo

 Week 1 – I wonder as I wonder

                        Eee I eee I O

                        A sailing we will go

                        Simon’s inverted U

                        The genius of ignorance

 

Week 2 – We have seen the enemy…

                        Gini and her beautiful curves

                        Theil’s Index

                        Atkinson’s Index

                        Sharrock’s Mobility Index

 

Week 3 – The arrival of the rentier

                        Lord of the manor

                        The financier

                        Regulation and its discontents

 

Week 4 – The Ancient Regime & Belle Epoch

                        The economics of Gustav Flaubert

                        The economics of Jane Austin

 

Week 5 – Heaven on earth

                        Trouble in paradise

                        The flight of the Phoenix

                        Economus interruptus

                        Back to the future

 

Week 5 – The wisdom of crowds

                        Our crowd

 

 

Facilitator: Darby Cartun

Not everyone loves to spend their free time in museums, tromping from gallery to gallery. Nor does everyone have the desire to engage in the arts.  For that reason it is wonderful that there are amazing places right out in public view to enjoy the art of design, sculpture and the decorative arts simply by passing by.  One can be in a subway, walking on the street or in an elevator – just to mention a few venues. This is an expanded course that had its beginnings in murals.  Come join the interactive and lively discussions about where, and what type of, art exists right out in the open for all to enjoy.

 

Intersection of Artist, Architect, and People in Public Spaces 
Darby Cartun, darbycartun@gmail.com

week 1: Europe World’s Fair- Picasso, Leger, Matisse

Week 2: Walls of Color- Hans Hofmann

Week 3: Changing American Lens-  Davis, Pollack

Week 4: WPA, Harlem Renaissance- Benton, Johnson

Week 5: Theatre spaces and holy spaces- Chagall , Rothko

Week 6: Connection of the muralist to the architect

Week 7: Mexican Muralists- Rivera, Orozco, Siqueiros

Week 8: Wrap Up – Sculpture in public spaces

Facilitator: Ted Wolff

Ten thousand Baby Boomers reach retirement age every year from now until 2030. Throughout our working lives, we are encouraged to save for retirement; yet, after retirement we are left with little or conflicting advice on how to manage those savings. This course examines some of the latest research and thinking about complex issues seniors face when planning for and investing during their retirement years.  Please note: we cover general concepts and tools for investing and planning, but do not provide specific advice to individuals.  Students should consult their own financial advisors or attorneys before making any investment decisions based on the material covered in class. 

 

Syllabus: Investments and Your Retirement 
Ted Wolff, kaleob@optonline.net 

Where did the corporate retirement plan go, or how we became responsible for our own retirement investments

What is the length of our planning horizon—the difference between life expectancy and longevity, and how that affects our decisions about right-sizing our next egg

Spending in Retirement and the phases of retirement. The mutual fund model (invest for performance) and the endowmnent model) invest for a needed return)

Asset allocation and withdrawal rates. Did the Financial Crisis of 2008 change anything? 

The use of the Monte Carlo simulation as a tool, and its critics. Key takeaways

 

Facilitator: Mark Albertson

Jihad is an Arabic term meaning “struggle.” For a Muslim, that struggle is of an internal nature; an effort by which the individual attempts to rid oneself of those impediments which compromise their becoming one with their religion.  Waging that struggle justifies the essence of Islam, which means surrender to God, upon which a Muslim embarks on that lifelong struggle as a member of the faithful.  However, the popular notion of Jihad held by many non-believers is that of Holy War and that is the essence of this course: to peel away the confusion, misconceptions and propagandistic perversions hampering a proper conception of not only what is construed as the Jihadi movement but, hopefully, fostering at the same time a better understanding of one of the globe’s most fascinating yet misunderstood religions.

This course is offered on two different days. Participants may register for only one section: 

Section 1: 8 sessions starting Thursday, Sept. 14 at 3:10 PM 
OR 
Section 2: 8 sessions starting Saturday, Sept. 16 at 9:10 AM

 
Flag of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, photo credit: Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=585902

 

Syllabus: Jihad! 
Mark Albertson, 
Albrts24@aol.com 

Week 1:  Sunni-Shia Split:

In 570 was born a man who would forever alter the face of the globe . . . Muhammad ibn Abdallah, AKA the one true Prophet, Muhammad.  This session will explore his organization of a movement that has come to be known as Islam.  In so doing, he charted the course for the expansion of a vast empire, one that would see to the massive conversion of peoples until finally, today, Islam boasts more than a billion adherents.  With his death, though, in 632, the seeds were planted for a discord among the Faithful which afflicts their beloved religion to the present day, the Sunni-Shia split.  

Week 2:  The Theorists:

Ahmad ibn Taymiyyah, Muhammad ibn Ab al-Wahhab, Haj Amin al-Husseini (the infamous Grand mufti of Jerusalem); Sayyid Qutb, theoretician of consequence; Hassan al-Banna, co-founder of the Muslim Brotherhood . . . this session will spotlight those practitioners of a conservative approach to the religion which will help set the stage for the likes of Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin-Laden, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. . .   

 Week 3:  Arab Nationalism, Arab Socialism:

In 1798, a French Revolutionary Army invaded Egypt and the Levant.  Brought forth were the ideas unleashed by the French Revolution—Liberalism, Democracy, Republicanism, Secularism, Socialism, Nationalism, Parliamentarianism . . . as the Ottoman Empire continued its precipitous decline, these ideas from a tumultuous Europe would generate a following, competing against those who prefer to purge Islam of its Ottoman image and create an Arab world based on the teachings of Muhammad.  Session will include briefs on Republicanism, Socialism, Marxism, Fascism, Syndicalism, as well as a breakdown of the Ba’ath Party.

 Week 4:  1979, Year of Consequence:

For Sunni Muslims, threats both sectarian and secular marked the year 1979.  In Afghanistan, Moscow continued its efforts to establish a satrap of Socialist Orientation in Kabul; while in Iran, the Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi fell from power in the Iranian Revolution.  Taking power in Tehran was the Shia regime of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.  Both posed threats of the first order to Sunni primacy in the Islamic world.  Pan-Arabism, that secular movement which owed its origins to the French Revolution was giving way to the emerging Pan-Islamic Movement.  The seeds for the post-Soviet conflict in Central Asia, Middle East and Africa were sown here.

 Week 5:  The Bear Went Over the Mountain:

December 1979, the Soviet Army steamrolls into Afghanistan:  The Mujahidin (Soldiers of God); essence of resistance—tribal, clannish, ethnic and religious disparities; influx of Muslim fighters from around the Islamic world; U.S. assistance and support for Jihadis.  Defeat of the Soviets, helped to spur the Pan-Islamic movement.  Analysis of the Jihadi movement and the collapse of the Soviet monolith.

Week 6:  Armies of the Uprooted and Disinherited:

The Taliban; al-Queda; Chechen Jihadis . . . such groups will be examined in a world changed by the demise of the Soviet Union; a world confronting the remaining superpower, the United States, as it attempts to continue to forge Pax Americana.  Reference will be made to Roger Trinquier, a French soldier who saw combat in North Vietnam and Algeria, and his 1962 study at the Army Command and General Staff College, that modern war for the foreseeable future will see developed nations taking on guerrillas and terrorists; who in the post-1945 world, are the new and modern soldiers.

Week 7:  Islamic State:

From its founding in 2006, an examination of this organization from a so-called terrorist group to a governing entity.  Analysis will be forthcoming comparing the Islamic State to the Damascus Protocol of 1914, a blueprint for an Arab State based off the carcass of the Ottoman Empire.

Week 8:  Jihad!

The evolving Pan-Islamic Movement takes the fight to Western interests in the Near East, spurred on by the American invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq; Western actions against Libya; civil war in Syria.  Sunni opposition to Iran (Persia) and growing Shia political power.  The staying power of al-Queda.  Jubhat al-Nusra.  Islamic State.  And . . . the threat posed to the Western induced border settlement from World War I and the quest to dominate the region’s massive energy potential.

Facilitator: Mark Albertson

Jihad is an Arabic term meaning “struggle.” For a Muslim, that struggle is of an internal nature; an effort by which the individual attempts to rid oneself of those impediments which compromise their becoming one with their religion.  Waging that struggle justifies the essence of Islam, which means surrender to God, upon which a Muslim embarks on that lifelong struggle as a member of the faithful.  However, the popular notion of Jihad held by many non-believers is that of Holy War and that is the essence of this course: to peel away the confusion, misconceptions and propagandistic perversions hampering a proper conception of not only what is construed as the Jihadi movement but, hopefully, fostering at the same time a better understanding of one of the globe’s most fascinating yet misunderstood religions.

This course is offered on two different days. Participants may register for only one section: 

Section 1: 8 sessions starting Thursday, Sept. 14 at 3:10 PM 
OR 
Section 2: 8 sessions starting Saturday, Sept. 16 at 9:10 AM

 

Flag of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, photo credit: 
Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=585902

 

Syllabus: Jihad! 
Mark Albertson, 
Albrts24@aol.com 

Week 1:  Sunni-Shia Split:

In 570 was born a man who would forever alter the face of the globe . . . Muhammad ibn Abdallah, AKA the one true Prophet, Muhammad.  This session will explore his organization of a movement that has come to be known as Islam.  In so doing, he charted the course for the expansion of a vast empire, one that would see to the massive conversion of peoples until finally, today, Islam boasts more than a billion adherents.  With his death, though, in 632, the seeds were planted for a discord among the Faithful which afflicts their beloved religion to the present day, the Sunni-Shia split.  

Week 2:  The Theorists:

Ahmad ibn Taymiyyah, Muhammad ibn Ab al-Wahhab, Haj Amin al-Husseini (the infamous Grand mufti of Jerusalem); Sayyid Qutb, theoretician of consequence; Hassan al-Banna, co-founder of the Muslim Brotherhood . . . this session will spotlight those practitioners of a conservative approach to the religion which will help set the stage for the likes of Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin-Laden, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. . .   

 Week 3:  Arab Nationalism, Arab Socialism:

In 1798, a French Revolutionary Army invaded Egypt and the Levant.  Brought forth were the ideas unleashed by the French Revolution—Liberalism, Democracy, Republicanism, Secularism, Socialism, Nationalism, Parliamentarianism . . . as the Ottoman Empire continued its precipitous decline, these ideas from a tumultuous Europe would generate a following, competing against those who prefer to purge Islam of its Ottoman image and create an Arab world based on the teachings of Muhammad.  Session will include briefs on Republicanism, Socialism, Marxism, Fascism, Syndicalism, as well as a breakdown of the Ba’ath Party.

 Week 4:  1979, Year of Consequence:

For Sunni Muslims, threats both sectarian and secular marked the year 1979.  In Afghanistan, Moscow continued its efforts to establish a satrap of Socialist Orientation in Kabul; while in Iran, the Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi fell from power in the Iranian Revolution.  Taking power in Tehran was the Shia regime of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.  Both posed threats of the first order to Sunni primacy in the Islamic world.  Pan-Arabism, that secular movement which owed its origins to the French Revolution was giving way to the emerging Pan-Islamic Movement.  The seeds for the post-Soviet conflict in Central Asia, Middle East and Africa were sown here.

 Week 5:  The Bear Went Over the Mountain:

December 1979, the Soviet Army steamrolls into Afghanistan:  The Mujahidin (Soldiers of God); essence of resistance—tribal, clannish, ethnic and religious disparities; influx of Muslim fighters from around the Islamic world; U.S. assistance and support for Jihadis.  Defeat of the Soviets, helped to spur the Pan-Islamic movement.  Analysis of the Jihadi movement and the collapse of the Soviet monolith.

Week 6:  Armies of the Uprooted and Disinherited:

The Taliban; al-Queda; Chechen Jihadis . . . such groups will be examined in a world changed by the demise of the Soviet Union; a world confronting the remaining superpower, the United States, as it attempts to continue to forge Pax Americana.  Reference will be made to Roger Trinquier, a French soldier who saw combat in North Vietnam and Algeria, and his 1962 study at the Army Command and General Staff College, that modern war for the foreseeable future will see developed nations taking on guerrillas and terrorists; who in the post-1945 world, are the new and modern soldiers.

Week 7:  Islamic State:

From its founding in 2006, an examination of this organization from a so-called terrorist group to a governing entity.  Analysis will be forthcoming comparing the Islamic State to the Damascus Protocol of 1914, a blueprint for an Arab State based off the carcass of the Ottoman Empire.

Week 8:  Jihad!

The evolving Pan-Islamic Movement takes the fight to Western interests in the Near East, spurred on by the American invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq; Western actions against Libya; civil war in Syria.  Sunni opposition to Iran (Persia) and growing Shia political power.  The staying power of al-Queda.  Jubhat al-Nusra.  Islamic State.  And . . . the threat posed to the Western induced border settlement from World War I and the quest to dominate the region’s massive energy potential.

Facilitator: Darby Cartun

Two artistic giants spent their careers sizing each other up and pursuing diverging artistic goals.  While their personal relationship was limited, the artistic level of their connection was sustained and limitlessly important to each other.  There were profound affinities of motivation and attitude. Rivalries and curiosity about each other’s work and a need for the other’s good opinion abounded.  They molded the art of the 20th Century. This is a very interactive course for those with opinions, curiosity and a desire to explore.  We may consider a non-class field trip to the Museum of Modern Art depending on the interest of the group.

 Matisse n Picasso signature Matisse Matisse n Picasso signature Picasso Red

 

 

 

Syllabus: Matisse and Picasso: A Life Long Conversation
Darby Cartun, 
darbycartun@gmail.com

Week 1: Biographies of  Picasso and Matisse

Week 2: Early 1900’s Paris Influences and paintings

Week 3: Still Life

Week 4: Cubist Years

Week 5: Creative Copies

Week 6: Connection of the muralist to the architect

Week 7: Shared Themes

Week 8: Wrap Up – War Years and After

 

Facilitator: Cindy Sinor,

Artistic inspiration surrounds us in nature. This drawing course provides an opportunity to create artwork from a variety of subjects found outdoors. Each session focuses on a different hands-on project including still life, landscape and wildlife subjects. Classes begin with a short lesson and demonstration followed by guided studio time to work on drawing assignments. Basic drawing techniques using graphite and colored pencils are incorporated throughout.  Students may choose to work in graphite, drawing pencils or both and must supply their own materials.   The instructor provides most still life items and photos to draw.  However, participants may be asked to bring items for one or two sessions.   All levels are welcome.

Materials: Bring a set of graphite drawing pencils, or a set of 72 Prismacolor Premier Soft Core colored pencils (recommended), pad of drawing paper, kneaded eraser, battery operated eraser.

 

Syllabus:

Nature’s Sketchbook
Cindy Sinor, 
czsinor@gmail.com

 

Week 1: Fall themed still life

Week 2: Fruit and Vegetable Botanical Drawing

Week 3: Drawing Flowers

Week 4: Trees and Fall Foliage

Week 5: Mini Landscapes

Week 6: Feathered Friends – Drawing Birds  

Facilitator: Leslie Kerr

Participants discover ways to organize and record the chapters of their lives in a thoughtful, meaningful way for family and future generations to treasure.  Those just beginning to gather their thoughts for their memoir journey, as well as those who have already begun the process, are welcome. 

 

Syllabus: Once Upon A Lifetime:  Milestones and Memories

Leslie Kerr 

 The objective of this course is to help students organize and record the chapters of their lives in a thoughtful, meaningful way for family and future generations to treasure.  Those just starting to gather their thoughts for their memoir journey are welcome, as well as those who have been recording the events of their lives for this class or independently.  All are welcome.

 

Week 1.    Participants will share what inspired them to take the course.  Explore why people read memoirs; what is a memoir (characteristics); what makes a memoir meaningful,  memorable, and interesting?  Instructor will provide writing prompt to help participants begin to think about events in their lives and begin to write.  Students will be asked to start a list of what they would like to include in their memoirs.

 

Week 2.      Participants will explore what counts as ideas and content for a memoir; discuss the characteristics of a memoir and where to begin.  Class will discuss “mapping” and how it is used in writing memoirs. 

 

Week 3.    Using the mapping exercise, participants will discuss the organization of their memoir in preparation to write: Is the Event Clear and Focused?; How Do I Stay “On Topic”, i.e., is my main idea clear from episode to episode?; Have I Written in First Person?; Is the Episode Based on Truth?; Is the Episode Based on the Writer’s Experience and Not the Event Itself?

 

Week 4.   Class members will begin to share their work.  Feedback and constructive comments will be offered from instructor and participants.

Week 5.    of Fundamentals of Writing—ways to make writing stronger.  Goal is to strengthen our writing so our readers will enjoy the memoir experiences “first-hand”, based on the writer’s vivid descriptions.

 

Week 6.    Participants continue to share their work.

 

Week 7.    Discuss ways memoirs can be “presented” and/or published.  Final drafts of work thus far will be shared and critiqued.  Suggestions will be provided as how to keep writing after the class ends.

 

Week 8.    Discuss what participants have learned over the course of the last eight weeks.  Participants will share their memoir experiences recorded to this point and given strategies to complete this very worthwhile project once the class has ended.

Facilitator: Richard Di Vecchio

On December 7, 1941, a sudden attack by the Empire of Japan catapulted the United States into a war most American did not want. We study the Japanese reasons for beginning the war, America’s unpreparedness and the many blunders made by both sides. We analyze how secret codes and intelligence gathering played important roles and, finally, the controversy surrounding whether President Roosevelt did or did not have knowledge of the attack prior to December 7, 1941 – a conspiracy theory that exists to this day.  Knowing the facts will, hopefully, dispel the myths and clear the air.

Richard Di Vecchio has given classes on Spies and Espionage, America’s Secret Intelligence Services, The Roaring Twenties and a series of five courses on American Presidents.  He is currently a board member at Lifetime Learners and Chair of the Curriculum Committee.

8 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 1:10 PM

 

Syllabus: Pearl Harbor
Richard Di Vecchio

Week One: Overview of the Japanese surprise attack and the American response at Pearl Harbor; President Roosevelt asks for a Declaration of war; Congress acts and reacts. The European war’s influence on the United States, Japan and Great Britain.

Week Two: A study of Japanese imperialism. The Japanese-Sino war; the Japanese -Russian wars; the Sino-Japanese wars.

Week Three: President Theodore Roosevelt’s intervention and Nobel Peace Prize; Japanese plans to attack America; Japanese views of the attack and the real reasons.

Week Four: “Magic”, the cryptanalysis process that broke the Japanese codes; the code breakers and their achievements and failures.

Week Five: How prepared are Pearl Harbor’s defenses? What types of equipment including ships, airplanes and military apparatus were available.

Week Six: The Pearl Harbor attack! The losses; the gains.

Week Seven: Placing the blame. The heroes; the villains. And another mystery: The Sinking of the SS Cynthia Olson; the Japanese submarine that sank her.

Week Eight: Judgment of the experts, the myths, conspiracy and the truth.

Facilitator: Paul Gettler

Join us to examine great American political films. Films are analyzed in terms of artistic merit and political message. Movies to be discussed include Citizen Kane; The Devil’s Disciple; Fail-Safe, The Godfather; Reds; Good Night, and Good Luck; JFK and Inside Man.

Syllabus: Paul Gettler
Politics Via Film:  Orson Wells to Denzel Washington

  • The Stranger, Citizen Kane, the Third Man
  • The Devil’s Disciple, Seven Days in May, Spartacus
  • Fail Safe, The Best Man, The Grapes of Wrath
  • The Godfather, Munity on the Bounty, The Ugly American
  • Reds, Bonnie and Clyde, Bulworth
  • Good Night and Good Luck, Reds, Bugsy
  • JFK, Path to War, The Eagle Has Landed
  • Glory, Inside Man, Malcolm X

 

Photo credit RKO Radio Pictures, still photographer Alexander Kahle – International Photographer, Volume XII, Number 12, January 1941 (front cover), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46766797

 

 

Facilitator:

Using the medium of film to examine World War I  we discuss films such as Paths of Glory, The Promise, Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, A Very Long Engagement, Wilson and Haber.   All of these films provide insight into this war and its terrible consequences.

Paul Gettler 
Syllabus: The Politics of Film: The First World War

  • Overview and Introduction
  • The War in the Desert and the War in the Straits
  • The Red Baron and the War in the Air
  • The Experience of Combat on the Western Front
  • Wilson and American Intervention
  • Russia:  War, Revolution, and Defeat
  • Poison Gas, the Easter Uprising, Mata Hari
  • Pandemics, Genocide, and Peace

Facilitator: Mark Albertson

America’s renowned Sovietologist and foreign policy guru George Kennan once observed that whether it be Czarist Russia, Stalinist Russia, Khrushchev’s Soviet Union, Brezhnev’s Soviet Union or Putin’s Russia, Russia is Russia, and while there is much truth in Mr. Kennan’s abbreviated summary, there, is, however, a depth of history that is waiting for those eager enough to unlock the annals of the largest nation on earth.  This course chronicles Russia beginning with Kievan-Rus up to today’s post-Soviet-Russia — an immensely proud nation, which is seeking to find its way in an uncertain world order.

 

8 sessions starting Thursday, Sept. 14 at 1:10 PM

Syllabus: Russia:  A History
Mark Albertson,
Albrts24@aol.com 

Week 1:  Pre-Romanov Russia:

From the rise of the East Slavic State, Kievan-Russ, circa 880 A.D., followed by the Golden Age of Kiev; the Mongol invasions; the rise of Muscovy and the evolution of the burgeoning Russian aristocracy to 1613, when Mikhail Romanov began a dynasty that would rule Russia for three hundred years . . . The early years of the Motherland are chronicled.  

Week 2:  Romanov Russia, I:

As the Romanovs compete with the Kingdoms of Sweden and Poland, the growth of Russia as a power is traced.  Peter the Great; Catherine the Great; the Napoleonic Wars; Russia to 1815.  The Time of Troubles will be explored; Serfdom; the Autocratic State that has come to characterize Russia.

  Week 3:  Romanov Russia, II:

The 19th century Great Game of expansion and competition with the Western colonial powers; the Industrial Revolution; the rise of Italy and Germany; the Crimean War and declining Ottoman power; Bismarck and the Balance of Power in Europe; the rising tide of discontent in Russia; the 1904-05 Russo-Japanese War; 1905, St. Petersburg and Father Capon; countercoup by Czar Nicholas II; 1914, Lights Going Out in Europe; collapse of Russian Army, summer 1916.

 Week 4:  Russia Goes Red:

February 1917, soldiers, workers and peasants revolt against Czar Nicholas II.  A provisional government led by Alexander Kerensky will give way to the Bolshevik regime of Vladimir Lenin.  Civil war will erupt throughout Mother Russia.  But the Bolsheviks will emerge victorious, creating a new society in the wake of the defunct Romanovs.  But upon Lenin’s death in 1924, the Revolution will take a new course; one in which Winston Churchill will observe, “The worst calamity to befall Russia was Lenin’s birth; the next worst, his death.”

Week 5:  Stalin’s Revolution:

Stalin reconfigures Bolshevik Russia in his image:  First, he outmaneuvers Leon Trotsky to become Lenin’s heir.  Next the Georgian chieftain embarks into a sojourn of State Capitalism in a crash effort to industrialize the Soviet State:  Collectivization; industrialization; the Kirov murder and the Great Purges.  The rise of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.  The Nazi-Soviet Nonaggression Pact, August 23-24, 1939.  Resumption of the Great War.

Week 6:  Advent of the Cold War:

The Great Patriotic War; Soviets determine the land campaign for the Allies in World War II.  End of the Grand Alliance.  George Kennan and Containment.  1949:  China goes Red; Russia explodes its first atomic bomb.  Korean War.  French defeat in Vietnam, 1954.  The Middle East; America and Vietnam.  Revolutionary Nationalism

Week 7:  Demise of the Soviet Monolith:

The Nuclear Arms Race; Nixon and China; American defeat in Vietnam; defeat of the Arab armies in 1973; Hanoi victorious 1975; Sadat changes sides; Cuban troops in Angola; Vietnamese troops in Cambodia; 1979 Iranian Revolution; 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan; 1980 Iran-Iraq War; rise of Pan-Islam; Reagan as president; Soviet defeat in Afghanistan; collapse of the Soviet monolith; Persian Gulf War.

Week 8:  Putin’s Russia:

Like Napoleon III of France in the middle of the 19th century, Vladimir Putin seems intent on raising Russia’s status as a world power:  How the former KGB functionary attained power; spread of NATO into Eastern and Central Europe; Shanghai Cooperation Organization and China; Russia’s 21st century strongman and his actions in Syria, Crimea and Ukraine, where he wages a conflict with the pseudo-Fascist regime in Kiev for control of eastern Ukraine.  And just like during the Cold War, the Atomic Sword of Damocles looms in the background with any strategic competition with the United States.  

Facilitator: David Shafer

Join us to see six operettas from 100 years ago, including some with very rustic gypsy settings and themes. We begin with Kalman’s The Gypsy Princess, then on to Johann Strauss’ The Gypsy Baron, followed by four of Lehar’s operettas, The Land of Smiles, Gypsy Love, Paganini and Tsarevich.  All very melodic with interesting plots.  Unlike most operas, nobody dies.

 

6 sessions starting Monday, Sept. 11 at 1:10 PM

Syllabus: Six Hungarian and Gypsy Operettas
Dave Shafer,
shaferlens@sbcglobal.net

  • Week 1: Kalman’s The Gypsy Princess
  • Week 2: Strauss’s The Gypsy Baron
  • Week 3: Lehar’s   The Land of Smiles
  • Week 4: Lehar’s   Gypsy Love   
  • Week 5.   Lehar’s Paganini
  • Week 6.  Lehar’s Tsarevitch      

Facilitator: Gilda Simpkin

Whether you remember some phrases from your childhood or just know the words used in sitcoms, you can begin to speak this colorful language. Build a vocabulary and learn enough grammar to be able to speak rudimentary YiddishHave fun learning the more common idioms and expressions that can be used in everyday conversations.  If you always wanted to know what your parents or grandparents  were saying or baffle your kids and friends, enjoy  fun learning this old language. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is required.

 

8 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 3:10 PM

Syllabus: So You Want to Speak Yiddish?

Gilda Simkin

  • Week 1: Words and Expressions we all know
  • Week 2: The Meaning of Common Names
  • Week 3: Pronouns and Verbs Make a Sentence
  • Week 4: Naming and Describing Your Family and Relatives
  • Week 5: Talking About Food, Of course
  • Week 6: Naming What You Wear and How it looks
  • Week 7: Traveling and Visiting Other Places
  • Week 8: Conversing with Your Peers

Facilitator: Paul Sarno

What is President Duterte of the Philippines doing, and why? Why was there another military coup in Thailand? Why do Burmese Buddhists react so violently to Muslim Rohingyas? Why is China so aggressive in seeking control of the South China Sea? We attempt to answer these questions and others while explaining the politics governing the 11 South East Asia countries extending from Myanmar to Timor- Leste. Brief histories are included but emphasis is on the post-independence period.  This exploration should further an understanding of the area and enhance any anticipated visit.

 

8 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 1:10 PM

Syllabus: Southeast Asian Politics
Paul Sarno,
Paulsarno@aol.com

  • Class I: Introduction                 
  • Geography, Names of the 11 countries, Present leadership and government, Trade and Economic statistics
  • Class 2:  The South China Sea dispute with China
  • Classes 3-8: The Politics of the Individual Countries
  • Class 3: Viet Nam and Laos
  • Class 4: Thailand and Cambodia
  • Class 5: Myanmar/Burma and Philippines
  • Class 6: Indonesia and Singapore
  • Class 7: Malaysia and Brunei
  • Class 8: Timor Leste

Facilitator: Helen M. Garinger, PhD,

Through class discussions, we cover a variety of topics pertaining to women (and men).  Starting with a brief historical overview, we journey through issues for today’s women, the media portrayal of women, the obsession of appearance, older women (and men) living in an ageist society and a look towards the future.  Readings are articles from The New York Times and other sources.

Helen M. Garinger, PhD, began her career in the area of child development and public education, which provided her valuable insight over the course of her 20-year career teaching art to thousands of students.  She became a middle school counselor before her doctoral studies, then worked as a therapist counseling children, adolescents and their parents. For 13 years Dr. Garinger has taught graduate students who are training to become school and mental health counselors.

8 sessions starting Thursday, Sept. 14 at 1:10 PM

 

 

 

Syllabus:   Today’s women: Where are we going from here?

Helen M. Garinger, Ph.D.

 

Week 1: Historical perspective

  1. Main historical events
  2. Themes that were created
  3. Strides
  4. What about the men?

 

READINGS

The Seneca Falls Convention

The Sexual Politics of 2016 – David Brooks, March 29, 2016

Female Pilot Unit Gains Support in Congress for Right to Arlington Burials – Michael S. Schmidt, Feb. 27, 2016

Key Moments Since 1992, ‘The Year of the Woman’- Alix Strauss, April 2, 2017

Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Gloria Steinem on the Unending Fight for Women’s Rights – Philip Galanes, Nov. 14, 2015

Showdown on Abortion at the Supreme Court – Editorial Board, Feb. 27, 2016

 

Week 2: Issues for today’s women (vs men)

  1. Sexism
  2. Power
  3. Money

READINGS

Because I Was a Girl, I Was Told … Mary Jo Murphy & Sona Patel, Nov. 12, 2016

Beer Ads That Portray Women as Empowered Consumers, Not Eye Candy – Zach Schonbrun, Jan 31, 2016

How Wall Street Bro Talk Keeps Women Down – Sam Polk July 7, 2016

In Sexual Harassment Cases, What Are We Settling For? Bryce Covert  April 10, 2017

Is Your Pastor Sexist? Julia Baird  APRIL 19, 2017

It’s Payback Time for Women Judith Shulevitz JAN. 8, 2016

Sexism in the Kitchen Jen Agg Oct. 19, 2015

Speaking While Female, and at a Disadvantage Marie Tessier @Suffragist Oct. 27, 2016

When women win, men win too- Nicholas Kristof July 30, 2016

 

Week 3 & 4: Media and the portrayal of women (vs men)

  1. Pink
  2. Raising young girls
  3. Mean girls
  4. Media

READINGS

Chapter from Cinderella Ate my Daughter- Peggy Ornstein

Yes, I’m Fat. It’s O.K. I Said It. Sarai Walker Feb. 6, 2016

When Can Women Stop Trying to Look Perfect? Jennifer Weiner Jan. 8, 2016

The Thin Gene – Pagan Kennedy,  Nov. 25, 2016

Hair, Makeup and business deals – Brooks Barnes March 5, 2016

Attention, Teenagers: Nobody Really Looks Like That – Perri Klass, M.D. , Aug 1, 2016

 The New Yorker, September 2, 2016 “Morgan,” “The Girls,” and the Beautiful Cyborg

       Jia Tolentino

What Does a Lifetime of Leers Do to Us? – Jessica Valenti June 4, 2016

 

Week 5: Older women vs older men

  1. Social implications
  2. Invisibility
  3. Fashion/Style
  4. Employment issues
  5. Ageist society

 

READINGS

Her Age? Glad You Asked – Katherine Rosman, Nov 25, 2016

Is It Time for Wonder Woman to Hang Up Her Bathing Suit? – Vanessa Friedman, Oct. 20, 2016

To Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year-Old – Pagan Kennedy April 7, 2017

An 80-Year-Old Model Reshapes China’s Views on Aging – Didi KirstenTatlow Nov. 3, 2016

Don’t Dress Your Age – Julia Baird Oct. 21, 2016

Of Retirement Age, but Remaining in the Work Force – Paula Span Aug. 1, 2016

Walk, Stretch or Dance? Dancing May Be Best for the Brain Gretchen Reynolds Mar. 29, 2017

 

Week 6 & 7: Role of today’s woman in other cultures and our society

  1. Millennials
  2. Baby boomers
  3. Generation Xers and Ys
  4. Similarities and differences? Education
  5. Other cultures
    1. How much freedom
    2. Education
    3. Employment
  6. Society’s expectations and limitations

READINGS

Review: ‘Moana,’ Brave Princess on a Voyage With a Chicken – A. O. SCOTT Nov. 22, 2016

Forging a Path for Women, Deep Into India’s Sacred Shrines – Geeta Anand April 29, 2016

Her Father Shot Her in the Head, as an ‘Honor Killing’ – Nicholas Kristof Jan. 30, 2016

‘I Live in a Lie’: Saudi Women Speak Up – Mona El-Naggar Oct. 28, 2016

In Saudi Arabia, Where Women’s Suffrage Is a New Idea – Carol Giacomo, Nov. 2, 2015

ISIS Women and Enforcers in Syria Recount Collaboration, Anguish and Escape – Azadeh Moaveni Nov. 21, 2015

Nadia Murad, Yazidi Woman Who Survived ISIS Captivity, Wins Human Rights Prize –Sewell Chan & Somini Sengupta Oct. 10, 2016

 

Week 8: Where can we go from here?

  1. Women in politics
  2. Why not a woman president?
  3. Change perceptions:
    1. Power
    2. Money
    3. Education
    4. STEM
    5. Training? Respect

 

READINGS

Since When Is Being a Woman a Liberal Cause? – Susan Chira Feb. 11, 2017 

Striving for Her Piece of the Pie – Susan Hartman May 7, 2016

The Problem for Women Is Not Winning. It’s Deciding to Run. – Claire Cain Miller @clairecm Oct. 25, 2016 

The Senate Bathroom Angle – Gail Collins, Dec. 22, 2016

Facilitator: Nina Lesiga

Learning to play the ukulele is great fun in a group setting. We cover chord basics and strumming techniques while playing in unison.  Students leave each session uplifted by creating community music. Participants are taught to play 10 songs!

Materials: a tuned soprano or concert ukulele, a folder for handouts and a pen. Optional: a smart phone app for tuning an electric tuner (e.g., Snark brand). 

5 sessions starting Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 1:10 PM 

 

Syllabus: Ukulele Adventure
Nina Lesiga, N.Lesiga@gmail.com  

Parts of a Ukulele, playing position, tuning, finger position, achieving good sound quality. Strumming – hand position, reading chord diagram and song sheet handouts. Warm-up exercise, chords, fingering, transitioning between chords, rhythm, strum patterns.

  • Leaving on a Jet Plane; Twinkle, Twinkle Littler Star
  • Under the Boardwalk, Puff the Magic Dragon
  • You Are My Sunshine, Over the Rainbow
  • Happy Together, What a Wonderful World
  • Let It Be, I Can’t Help Falling in Love

 

 

 

Facilitator: Bela Szabo

Become a budding artist.  Discover the joys and challenges of watercolor.   This course offers step-by-step guidance in techniques – brush strokes, color mixing and composition – that create realistic landscapes, seascapes and still life paintings.  Pre-created scenes are available for purchase. Do not purchase any art supplies until you receive a list at the first class.  If you already have supplies, bring them.  The facilitator offers supplies for purchase.

Course size is limited.

 

8 sessions starting Friday, Sept. 15 at 10:10 AM

Facilitator: Bela Szabo

 

Watercolor: Intermediate

If you are an intermediate-level watercolorist, here’s a chance to improve your technique. This course is a step-by-step guide to painting traditional landscapes, seascapes and still life.  We cover these techniques: textures, perspectives, transparent washes, masking, planning and composition.  Bring paints (tubes preferred), a palette, your favorite brushes, watercolor paper and a water container to class.  Some pre-created scenes and supplies are available for purchase.

Course size is limited.

8 sessions starting Monday, Sept. 11 at 3:10 PM

Facilitator: Pat Spoor

What is the women’s experience and who gets to tell it?  Through the genre of the short story we read authors who give language and imagery to the female experience, expose lives of struggle, risk-taking, humor and fun while forever needing to push against the boundaries of   the status quo. These authors examine the inner lives of working class women and the privileged, as they have been careful observers of their worlds.   Their writings, from the 1800s to the present, are as diverse as the tales they tell, but are alike in their capability to reveal the   powerful determination of women as they grow into selfhood.  Understanding women’s ways of being through fictional narratives invite today’s women to consider their own selfhood and how it’s informed by historical truths.  Participants read two short stories each week focusing on content, inviting analytical reading and vibrant discussions about the rich and complex lives of women.

6 sessions starting Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 3:10 PM

 

Syllabus: Writing Women: Short Fiction and the Struggle for Selfhood 
Patricia Spoor  

  • Week 1:  Introduction and a reading   
  • Week 2:  Freedom from Cultural Boundaries
  • Week 3:  Women’s Bodies
  • Week 4:  Women’s Ambition   
  • Week 5:  Women and Sexuality
  • Week 6:  Women and Education